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Caregiving Consultation

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Consultation has concluded

Each year, millions of Canadians provide care to their loved ones, and they do so while balancing work and other responsibilities. What’s more, as the population ages, the demand for caregiving is expected to continue growing.

The Government of Canada recognizes that the support for caregivers provided through Employment Insurance (EI) can be difficult to access and has committed to introduce a more flexible and inclusive benefit and, for workers in federally regulated enterprises, corresponding unpaid leave provisions under the Canada Labour Code.

Caregivers currently have access to EI Caregiving Benefits and unpaid job-protected leaves through the Canada Labour Code in two specific situations. Through the Compassionate Care Benefit and the Compassionate Care Leave, eligible caregivers may receive EI benefits when they take time off work to provide end-of-life care for a family member or friend. Through the Parents of Critically Ill Children Benefit and the Leave Related to Critical Illness, eligible parents may receive EI benefits when they take time off work to provide care to a child with a life-threatening condition.

To be eligible for these or other EI special benefits (maternity, parental and sickness benefits), claimants must have accumulated at least 600 insurable hours in the 52 weeks prior to their claim and have a reduction of their employment earnings of at least 40 percent. Self-employed Canadians may also be eligible if they have opted into the EI program. EI benefits pay 55 percent of an eligible employee’s regular weekly earnings up to the maximum insurable earnings level, or a maximum of $537 per week in benefits.

The purpose of this consultation is to better understand the situations in which caregivers and their families could benefit from additional support in the form of benefits and leave.

Please read the discussion paper before submitting your views.

Each year, millions of Canadians provide care to their loved ones, and they do so while balancing work and other responsibilities. What’s more, as the population ages, the demand for caregiving is expected to continue growing.

The Government of Canada recognizes that the support for caregivers provided through Employment Insurance (EI) can be difficult to access and has committed to introduce a more flexible and inclusive benefit and, for workers in federally regulated enterprises, corresponding unpaid leave provisions under the Canada Labour Code.

Caregivers currently have access to EI Caregiving Benefits and unpaid job-protected leaves through the Canada Labour Code in two specific situations. Through the Compassionate Care Benefit and the Compassionate Care Leave, eligible caregivers may receive EI benefits when they take time off work to provide end-of-life care for a family member or friend. Through the Parents of Critically Ill Children Benefit and the Leave Related to Critical Illness, eligible parents may receive EI benefits when they take time off work to provide care to a child with a life-threatening condition.

To be eligible for these or other EI special benefits (maternity, parental and sickness benefits), claimants must have accumulated at least 600 insurable hours in the 52 weeks prior to their claim and have a reduction of their employment earnings of at least 40 percent. Self-employed Canadians may also be eligible if they have opted into the EI program. EI benefits pay 55 percent of an eligible employee’s regular weekly earnings up to the maximum insurable earnings level, or a maximum of $537 per week in benefits.

The purpose of this consultation is to better understand the situations in which caregivers and their families could benefit from additional support in the form of benefits and leave.

Please read the discussion paper before submitting your views.

Survey of Canadian Caregivers

Consultation has concluded