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Modernizing Federal Labour Standards

Consultation has concluded

Minister's Message

The world of work has changed significantly over the past few decades. The Government of Canada knows that as workplaces evolve, so too must the labour standards in those workplaces. Many Canadians have told us they are worried about the lack of security and predictability of many of the jobs that are available today, and whether they offer fair benefits and compensation.

Today, I’m asking for your input as we build a plan for action.

I have been mandated by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to ensure that Canadians can continue to count on a robust and modern set of federal employment standards. These standards establish the basic rights of workers in the federally regulated private sector —hours of work, holidays, leaves, wages and other working conditions.

I invite all Canadians to participate in the consultation on federal labour standards. These standards may affect you, someone you know, or a business you rely on. I’d like to hear your perspectives on how federal labour standards should be modernized to better protect Canadians and address the changing nature of work.

You can tell us about your experiences with the modern world of work and how they have affected you and your family or your business. You can also answer a survey designed to take the pulse of Canadians about good jobs and labour standards, especially those in the federally regulated private sector.

Your participation will help to ensure that federal labour standards reflect today’s workplace realities and protect vulnerable Canadians across the country.

The Honourable Patty Hajdu, Minister of Employment, Workforce Development and Labour


Minister's Message

The world of work has changed significantly over the past few decades. The Government of Canada knows that as workplaces evolve, so too must the labour standards in those workplaces. Many Canadians have told us they are worried about the lack of security and predictability of many of the jobs that are available today, and whether they offer fair benefits and compensation.

Today, I’m asking for your input as we build a plan for action.

I have been mandated by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to ensure that Canadians can continue to count on a robust and modern set of federal employment standards. These standards establish the basic rights of workers in the federally regulated private sector —hours of work, holidays, leaves, wages and other working conditions.

I invite all Canadians to participate in the consultation on federal labour standards. These standards may affect you, someone you know, or a business you rely on. I’d like to hear your perspectives on how federal labour standards should be modernized to better protect Canadians and address the changing nature of work.

You can tell us about your experiences with the modern world of work and how they have affected you and your family or your business. You can also answer a survey designed to take the pulse of Canadians about good jobs and labour standards, especially those in the federally regulated private sector.

Your participation will help to ensure that federal labour standards reflect today’s workplace realities and protect vulnerable Canadians across the country.

The Honourable Patty Hajdu, Minister of Employment, Workforce Development and Labour


The Government of Canada wants to better understand your perspectives on the changing world of work. Whether you have a great job, good working conditions and benefits, or you are worried about where your next short-term contract will come from, we want to hear from you!

We want to know:

  • What makes a good job? What makes a positive working environment?
  • How have changes in your work and workplace affected you?
  • How do temporary jobs impact you and your family?
  • What are your experiences with labour standards protections such as hours of work, breaks and rest periods, annual vacation, general holidays and sick leave?

If you are an employer or organization:

  • What makes a positive working environment for your employees?
  • How do labour standards affect your business or organization?
  • How could they be improved?
  • What are your experiences with temporary jobs?

To protect the privacy of individuals, please tell your story anonymously and avoid naming specific people and organizations or providing any type of information that would allow someone to be identified. For example, use general terms such as “my employer”, “my employees” or “my organization”.

The Government of Canada may use stories or excerpts from them in its communication and reporting activities.

This is a public‎ forum. Stories submitted online using the form below will be visible to other users. Registration is not mandatory, however, you will need to provide an email address and a screen name. Your email address will not be visible to others.

If you would rather share your story privately, you can submit it by email to NC-MLS_NTM-GD@labour-travail.gc.ca. Stories submitted by email will not be shared online.



CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.
  • Precarious worker at an Alberta University

    by Sessional Faculty, 4 months ago

    Dear committee,

    I have been a sessional instructor at MacEwan University since 2006. It's precarious work. Although over 50% of instructors at MacEwan are sessional faculty, we are not represented by our FA, which is now a union, but still doe not represent sessional faculty as equal members.  Our employer, the University, continues to create new, high-paid administrative positions, and puts up new buildings, and at the same time reduces our teaching hours and pay. Although many sessional instructors have been teaching at MacEwan for many years and are highly qualified for tenure-track positions that open up here and there,... Continue reading

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  • Flight attendants should get paid while they are working

    by Dustin , 4 months ago

    flight attendant has to report to the airport office at least two hours before the flight departure time to finish all the paper works document etc, 

    also has to check in 45 mins before the boarding time to prepare and setup the cabin to get it ready for passengers.  

    During boarding, flight attendant has to help with wheel chair passengers, kids travel without parents, adults over size and over weight baggage etc. 

    BUT, flight attendants  don’t actually get paid until the plane push back.  

    Means for all the minimum two hours of work, and no matter how bad... Continue reading

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  • Time at work that I am not paid for

    by aznlilboy88, 4 months ago

    Hello government of Canada,

    I am a flight attendant for Air Canada and I find that I've been giving out to much of my time at work and I am not getting paid for it. I will list you a lot of example so you will be able to determine if it is fair our not. 

    1. Show up at work 1 hour or sometime 1.5 hours before departure time. That's mean we have to be at the gate of our flight 1 hour before departure time to prepare the airplane like safety check on the equipment, count the meal,... Continue reading

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  • Reporting Pay in 2018?

    by pauline, 4 months ago

    Under the Code you only get paid if you show up at the workplace. It's called reporting pay and it's terribly antiquated.

    For example, my employer is in the aviation industry and requires us to do (unpaid) training from home; update our airport access pass on our own (unpaid) time; renew our passports on our own (unpaid) time; go for medicals on our own (unpaid) time; review operational updates on our own (unpaid) time, etc.  All this because we're not actually "reporting" to work and the Code makes it legal. Abusive but legal. Workplaces have changed. Labour Standards needs to... Continue reading

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  • Bad Faith Conduct of Employer

    by An Employee, 4 months ago

    I have worked at a bank for 6 years, during which I kept focusing on personal and professional development by completing various industrial licensing courses and certificates. At the same time, stayed as a top performer each year.

    However, there came a very self focuses unfair manager on my team in my last year of employment who would describe himself as leader so to distinguish from us as a regular worker. He wanted me to do things I didn't think was beneficial for the business and declined. He took it very personally and got back to me personally as well... Continue reading

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  • Job Security

    by Wendell, 4 months ago

    My issue with the labour force is that in this day and age, employers are more subjective to a person's place in society instead of how their skills can benefit a company. We all go through a necessary training to attain certain skills that are required to do a job. A lot of hard work goes into that. When a person is successful in obtaining certain degrees or certifications then it is within their right to be hired for that job based on their skill set. Today, you make a mistake in the past and in order to rectify it... Continue reading

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  • Aviation

    by K, 4 months ago

    do people know your flight attendants and pilots do not get paid until the plane moves but we are required to be At the airport or in the plane 1 hour before. As well the hours in between flights count as time on duty for rest purposes but we aren’t getting paid. If you worked any other job if you didn’t have a task you would be getting paid. This needs to change yesterday. 

    Also I can work a 1.5 hour flight show up an hour before and only get paid 1.5 hours. There is no regulated minimum for hours... Continue reading

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  • 14 years under federal labour "standards"

    by Michella, 4 months ago

    I am a mother of 2 who has worked in an industry covered by federal labour rules. I started working full-time 14 years ago but when I had my kids I went to part-time. I wish I could have stayed home to raise them but our family was not in a position to do so. I now make much less than when I was full-time, and, I make less than someone who is hired off the street as a full-timer...for the exact same job! I do the very same work as someone hired full-time and even with the years of... Continue reading

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  • MS and the Workplace

    by JStewart, 4 months ago

    Thank you for the opportunity to share my story. 

    I was diagnosed with Relapsing Remitting Multiple Sclerosis (RRMS) in 2004.  I was in my prime - a young vibrant woman, completing my Master's degree in Library and Information Studies and working for a large travel/tour company. I was devastated and I had no idea how this disease would impact my future.  What I discovered was the unpredictability and intermittent nature of RRMS created uncertainty for my employer and after a number of role changes my employer could no longer accommodate my disability due to the nature of my work.

    ... Continue reading

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